Tauntek Logic IC Tester

posted in: Other Projects 2

History

This Logic IC Tester by Tauntek is designed primarily to test 7400,74LS,74HC,74C and 4000 series integrated circuits. I first heard about this Logic IC Tester while watching this YouTube video. Based on the title of the video, I was under the impression that this was a crowd-designed tester, however, the title of the video refers to a viewer of the channel (Bob Grieb) having designed the tester.

I contacted Bob and purchased the bare PCB and the two pre-programmed PIC chips that come with the tester. It is up to you to purchase and install all the other components on the board. There are a LOT of resistors and diodes. This is the first project I am building specifically for use at my day job. I like tools that relate to the work I do. For my home office, I am building the Retro Chip Tester Pro.

How Much Does It Cost?

I am in NY and the cost of the PCB and two PIC chips, shipped, was $45.15 USD. The cost of the components will vary. I had most of the parts already, but there are a bunch that are not so common. I didn’t have enough resistors on hand and so I had to order some. The most expensive component in this kit is the 32-pin ZIF socket, and you must use one that can support both 0.3″ and 0.6″ ICs. I also opted to use a machined socket for the ZIF socket, rather than soldering the ZIF to the PCB. See the build section below for an overall view of what is used. You can get a BOM and schematic from the Tauntek product page under resources.

The Build

Usually I try to install the lowest height components first and gradually work up to the tallest components. But instead, I installed them as I received them in the mail, since there was a week or more each between the three orders to get all the parts, since I had to go with a couple of substitutes.

The first parts to be installed were the IC sockets, since I already had those. Next were the thirty eight (38) 1N4148 switching diodes, which I did not have enough of, so I had to order some more. I also installed the crystal. Next were the resistors and ceramic capacitors. I didn’t have enough of the 220Ω or 6.8K resistors on-hand, originally.

After installing the transistors (I had to get substitutes for these), I added the power LED and the test socket, which the ZIF socket will install into. Next I installed the DC jack, electrolytic capacitors and headers, as well as the two PIC chips. Finally, I installed the remaining integrated circuits and voltage regulator.

Here I have installed the ZIF socket and have taken a solder-side photo of the board as well. At this point, all that remains is to installed either an RS-232 interface with a DB-9 connector or a USB serial interface. I also need a power adapter.

THIS ARTICLE IS STILL BEING UPDATED. PLEASE CHECK BACK LATER!

Resources

Get more information and order your own Logic IC Tester at the product page

Retro Chip Tester Pro

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, SUGGESTIONS OR FEEDBACK ON THIS POST.

2 Responses

  1. Granz
    |

    Very nice, how well does it work?
    Also, about how much did you spend (for the PCB and PICs, and then for the rest)?

    • Chris Savage
      |

      I will add cost information to the post, which I am still working on. There will be screenshots and all, but I haven’t yet powered it up. It has a serial interface, so it is meant to be controlled via terminal (VT100). I’m trying to find / order one of those DB-9 ribbon cables that used to be in old computers and connected to a 2×5 header. Screenshots coming soon.

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